Monday, April 27, 2015

page 82 -- Frank Miller & Sons, Mason & Hamlin

updated 25 November 2015
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Hubbard & Norton was located at 185 Main St., New Britain, CT.
In July of 2015, Google Street View finds that 185 Main St. is now the home of the Institute of Technology and Business Development, a part of Central Connecticut State University:



Frank Miller & Sons started in Warsaw, NY (1838) before moving operations to NYC. The site Glass Bottle Marks summarizes firm history and elaborates on the various glassware associated with the company's distribution and advertising.





Google Books presents us with a sample ad for Frank Miller & Sons:



Mason & Hamlin's success story began with the invention of a twisted reed.


Mason & Hamlin elaborate on their corporate history.

Google Street View captures a recent view of 154 Tremont St., the location of Mason & Hamlin's factory:

Statue: "Industry"
Information Booth, Boston Common
"An 1895 Mason & Hamlin Model 512 reed organ. Displayed above the keyboard are the various medals and awards won by the company at international exhibitions." - jozg44, Wikimedia Commons
demo from YouTube:
1898 Mason & Hamlin Reed Organ: 3 Manuals and Pedal, performer unknown



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