Sunday, May 31, 2015

page 32 -- Walpole Emery Mills, Lanman & Kemp

updated 5 February 2018
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Kudos to Walter Arnold!
Walter's brother, Earl J. Arnold, missed these, but earned kudos later as a
superb Chamber of Commerce leader in several
New England communities, particularly Waltham MA.
Walter was an over-achiever
The next three cards were stock cards printed by "HJB" (that's just a guess) lithographers. As of this moment, I'm not sure of HJB's identity. In any case, the stock cards were produced with blanks for merchants to imprint their logo. The subject matter of the card had nothing to do with what the merchant was selling. Excelsior Metal Polish might have been expensive. Almost for sure it was not "earnestly precious," nor would it have made your love true, guaranteed the gender of your offspring or improved your posture. 




No trace of the Walpole Emery Mills remains.
Google Street View of State Street, Boston MA
near the location of  Holway, Wright & Miner,
which also disappeared. It may have been on
the site of the present Board of Trade building.
As cited in this Google Books reference, Excelsior Metal Polish won a bronze medal at an Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association in 1881:



On Digital Commonwealth, the Boston Public Library's copy of another trade card lists places in the Providence RI area that sold Excelsior Metal Polish:


Deep in the era of regional and national grocery store chains, it is hard to imagine such a multitude of independent grocers in a single metropolitan area. For a brief history of groceries in America, the postings at Groceteria are outstanding.

A Google Image search gives us a way to "visit" some of these old stores:


This blog's author remembers wooden floors and the all-consuming odor of coffee that emanated from the building seen below on John St. in Middletown NY in the 1950s, when it was an A&P store (Google Street View):

To a 7-year-old, this place was awesome for the sights, odors and flavors it contained!
A first-class sensory experience!
What's your grocery like?
Nothing captures the flavor of an old store quite like this video (by 805Roadking) of the Coolspring PA general store and Post Office:





copyright 1881 by Lanman & Kemp, NY;
one of the most colorful card series in the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection!
Almost too much color here!





Ad from Puck's Library via Google Books:





This product is manufactured in 2015 by Lanman & Kemp-Barclay Co., Inc., whose website gives this account of the history of the company:
"The Company was established in 1808 by Robert I. Murray at Number 313 Pearl Street, New York City, In 1835 said Robert I Murray was joined by D.T. Lanman and the business was conducted under the firm name Murray & Lanman at Number 69 Water Street, in said city.  In 1835 the firm name was changed to David T. Lanman and co.,  and in 1861 to Lanman & Kemp.  The three successive firms last named, remained in business at number 69 Water Street, New York City, until 1870 when the business moved to number 68 Williams St. in said city, where it remained until 1900 in which it moved to 135 Water St. New York City. 
"Continuously from the years 1861 to 1920 the business was conducted under the firm name of Lanman & Kemp and in the last named year it was Incorporated under the laws of the State of New York, under the title of Lanman & Kemp. In 1957 because of the rise in sale of our products the facility had to be enlarged, therefore it was resolved to move to 15 Grand Ave., Palisades Park, New Jersey and later on moved to 25 Woodland Ave., Westwood, New Jersey the present address of the company."
Google Street View of Murray & Lanman, Sept 2012
company history from YouTube as posted by Daisy Villegas

Here's a Victorian card for M&L soap:

Reverse of the card above.


Although sold, bottled, advertised and commonly referred to as Florida "water," this product is NOT intended for drinking! It is for external use as cologne or perfume, as the Lanman & Kemp label clearly indicates. Unbranded or home made products that incorporate methyl ("rubbing") alcohol are particularly dangerous if ingested, as methanol is poisonous.

  1. Need help? United States:
    1 (800) 222-1222

    American Association of Poison Control Centers

    Hours: 24 hours, 7 days a week
    Languages: English
    Website: www.aapcc.org
You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment below--



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The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.

page 33 -- Maison de Modes, Demorest Pattern Co. Inc.

updated 11 May 2018
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Maison de Modes, Hartford, Connecticut, aka Mademoiselle Balch



Wikipedia traces the career of Ellen Louise ("Nell") Demorest and the company she and her husband founded.

The Demorest Pattern Co., Inc. is discussed further on page 102 of the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection.

Recently added to the Diver collection is this Demorest card:

"The Demorest Reliable Patterns of the Fashions, have the endorsement of all the best Exhibitions including the Centennial and Paris Expositions and the patronage of the Elite of Society everywhere. Patterns ten to thirty cents each, sent post-free on receipt of price.  What to Wear, 15 cts. Port-Folio of Fashions, 15 cents.  Demorest's Quarterly Journal, 5 cents. Yearly, 15 cents. Post-free. Demorest's Monthly, the Model Parlor Magazine of America, 25 cents. Yearly, $3.00, with a valuable premium."

(reverse of above card)


(click to enlarge)

Sample contents of Demorest's from1879 offer a fascinating glimpse of Victorian style:














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The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.

You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--

Saturday, May 30, 2015

page 34 -- T.F. Barbour & Co.

updated 3 October 2015
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As of May 2015,  a Google search for "T.F. Barbour & Co." comes up with almost nothing of interest except other pages of the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection on which we find:

another card, scant information, page 71
two more cards, even less information, page 95
yet another card and, well shall we say you can help with this? page 132

There is, however, some information in this reference (Google Books):
Page 161





According to The Making of Bristol (p.161), the July 4, 1876 centennial parade passed by T.F. Barbour's store.

"The parade paused near the railway station. On one side were grocery stores and men's furnishing shops.The large Merrick and Merriman grocery and merchandise stores were in the Nott-Seymour buildings, which had burned down [in 1873]...but had been rebuilt in more handsome modern style. Adrian J. Muzzy and his partner, Thomas F. Barbour, had a men's clothing store there. The post office rented a room in the same building."

The Nott-Seymore buildings, p.156, original: Bristol Public Library
 I think this is about the corner of Main St. and Riverside Ave.
Bristol's population was about 5,000 at the time, give or take a few hundred depending on the number of fatal cases of typhoid fever, which was common at the time.


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The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.




You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--

page 35 -- "Patent Medicine", "Toadstool Millionaires", Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906

updated 4 October 2015
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The origin of these cards is a mystery. If you know anything abourt them, please comment below or email me. Thanks!

In order to understand the success of some of the trade card campaigns included in the Earl J. Arnold Advertising Card Collection, it is necessary to understand that circumstances in the late 19th century were extraordinarily difficult when it came to health problems. A couple of resources explain this well.

The explanation given by Peggy M. Baker, Director & Librarian, Pilgrim Society & Pilgrim Hall Museum on the Museum's page, "PATENT MEDICINE: Cures & Quacks" is particularly good:
"...Patent medicines are NOT medicines that have been patented. They are instead proprietary (i.e., "secret formula") and unproved remedies advertised and sold directly to the public.
 "The growth of the patent medicine industry was rooted in the medical shortcomings of the early 19th century. There were few doctors and those expensive. Prospects were not cheerful even for those who could afford professional medical care. Knowledge of human physiology and of the causes and progress of disease was extremely limited (it was not until 1861 that the theory of germs was first published by Louis Pasteur). Routine health care in the 19th century was generally provided by the mother of the family, relying on home remedies, recipes for which could often be found in cookbooks. Even the most skillful mother realized, however, that she could not combat the terrible diseases that became endemic during the course of the 19th century - typhoid, typhus, yellow fever, cholera."
Quackwatch's presentation of the Princeton University Press book, "The Toadstool Millionaires:A Social History of Patent Medicines in America before Federal Regulation-James Harvey Young PhD (1961) makes a very authoritative and thorough work on this subject available to the general public.

The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 required that ingredients be listed on sales packages. Alcohol and opiates and even poisons were revealed to be part of some of these potions. Opportunities to deceive the public by concealing ingredients were, unfortunately, replaced by other opportunities and fraudulent claims. These tended to move away from medicines toward health supplements and dietary aids in the 20th century, though stories of greed at the expense of your pocketbook and health continued to crop up in the 21st century.

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The author of this blog has attempted to correctly apply terms and conditions to Content. These pages and associated images are being made available exclusively for use in non-commercial and non-profit study, scholarship, research, or teaching . Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on this blog are the property of their respective owners.. In the event that any Content infringes your rights or Content is not properly identified or acknowledged please email me. Thanks! 


This site includes historical materials that may contain negative stereotypes or language reflecting the culture or language of a particular period or place. These items are presented as part of the historical record, and do not represent or in any way reflect the personal views of the author of this blog, his ancestors, or his family.


You'll "catch my ear"
--if you comment here--